Dr. Swarupa Mitra

Consultant and head of Unit, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer hospital and research Institute. Rohini. New Delhi
Work experience

Dr. Swarupa Mitra Consultant, radiation Oncology. Rajiv Gandhi Cancer hospital and research Institute. Rohini. New Delhi

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news highlight

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    At a camp with ROKO cancer

    Dr. Sawrupa Mitra at a camp with ROKO Cancer


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    European mates at ESTRO

    Dr. Swarupa Mitra with European mates at ESTRO.


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patient testimonials

  • This is to say a big THANK YOU, to every one,for your professional dedication, genuine care and love during my 3 months in India.

    Oladipo A. M.
  • We write to thank you for the services, the help and support we have received from the Artemis Hospital since we arrived here sometime ago.

    Babatunde A. Sowobi | Uyi Abike Sowobi
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How Does Radiation Work ?

Radiation therapy works by damaging the DNA of cells. The damage is caused by a photon, electron, proton, neutron, or ion beam directly or indirectly ionizing the atoms which make up the DNA chain. Indirect ionization happens as a result of the ionization of water, forming free radicals, notably hydroxyl radicals, which then damage the DNA.

 

In the most common forms of radiation therapy, most of the radiation effect is through free radicals. Because cells have mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, breaking the DNA on both strands proves to be the most significant technique in modifying cell characteristics. Because cancer cells generally are undifferentiated and stem cell-like, they reproduce more, and have a diminished ability to repair sub-lethal damage compared to most healthy differentiated cells. The DNA damage is inherited through cell division, accumulating damage to the cancer cells, causing them to die or reproduce more slowly.

 

One of the major limitations of radiotherapy is that the cells of solid tumors become deficient in oxygen. Solid tumors can outgrow their blood supply, causing a low-oxygen state known as hypoxia. Oxygen is a potent radiosensitizer, increasing the effectiveness of a given dose of radiation by forming DNA-damaging free radicals. Tumor cells in a hypoxic environment may be as much as 2 to 3 times more resistant to radiation damage than those in a normal oxygen environment.